Essays On The Grapes Of Wrath Theme

Essays On The Grapes Of Wrath Theme-68
In his brief history of California in Chapter 19, Steinbeck portrays the state as the product of land-hungry squatters who took the land from Mexicans and, by working it and making it produce, rendered it their own.Now, generations later, the California landowners see this historical example as a threat, since they believe that the influx of migrant farmers might cause history to repeat itself.Themes of Strength and Sacrifice in The Grapes of Wrath In Steinbeck's novel, The Grapes of Wrath, Ma Joad and Rose of Sharon graphically portray the themes of strength and sacrifice.

In his brief history of California in Chapter 19, Steinbeck portrays the state as the product of land-hungry squatters who took the land from Mexicans and, by working it and making it produce, rendered it their own.Now, generations later, the California landowners see this historical example as a threat, since they believe that the influx of migrant farmers might cause history to repeat itself.Themes of Strength and Sacrifice in The Grapes of Wrath In Steinbeck's novel, The Grapes of Wrath, Ma Joad and Rose of Sharon graphically portray the themes of strength and sacrifice.

Tags: Essays Written By TupacCase Study Houses Book TaschenEssay Marriage In Pride And PrejudiceMath Problem Solving Lesson PlansFiji Water Case Study Summary4th Sat EssayMusical Film Genre Essay

The Grapes of Wrath chronicles the story of two “families”: the Joads and the collective body of migrant workers.

Although the Joads are joined by blood, the text argues that it is not their genetics but their loyalty and commitment to one another that establishes their true kinship.

Nowhere is this more evident than at the end of the novel.

The Joads have suffered incomparable losses: Noah, Connie, and Tom have left the family; Rose of Sharon gives birth to a stillborn baby; the family possesses neither food nor promise of work.

In the migrant lifestyle portrayed in the book, the biological family unit, lacking a home to define its boundaries, quickly becomes a thing of the past, as life on the road demands that new connections and new kinships be formed.

The reader witnesses this phenomenon at work when the Joads meet the Wilsons.Then, after a brief expository chapter, the Joads immediately happen upon an instance of kindness as similarly self-propagating: Mae, a waitress, sells bread and sweets to a man and his sons for drastically reduced prices.Some truckers at the coffee shop see this interchange and leave Mae an extra-large tip.According to Steinbeck, many of the evils that plague the Joad family and the migrants stem from selfishness.Simple self-interest motivates the landowners and businessmen to sustain a system that sinks thousands of families into poverty.Yet it is at this moment (Chapter 30) that the family manages to rise above hardship to perform an act of unsurpassed kindness and generosity for the starving man, showing that the Joads have not lost their sense of the value of human life.Steinbeck makes a clear connection in his novel between dignity and rage.In Chapter 13, we learn that corporate gas companies have preyed upon the gas station attendant that the Joads meet.The attendant, in turn, insults the Joads and hesitates to help them.Steinbeck consistently and woefully points to the fact that the migrants’ great suffering is caused not by bad weather or mere misfortune but by their fellow human beings.Historical, social, and economic circumstances separate people into rich and poor, landowner and tenant, and the people in the dominant roles struggle viciously to preserve their positions.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Essays On The Grapes Of Wrath Theme

The Latest from www.kaworu.ru ©