H.G. Wells Invisible Man Essays

Wells is often credited, along with Hugo Gernsback (1884-1967) and Jules Verne (1828-1905) as being one of the fathers of science fiction.

Forty years after its publication, on the night of Halloween 1938, Orson Welles' Mercury Theatre on-air radio broadcast of the novel caused widespread panic in New York City.

Instead, he called his works "scientific romances," stressing their concrete humanity and de-emphasizing the abstract ideas at play.

A prolific and political journalist as well, the outspoken, larger-than-life figure is still best known for a string of books written at the beginning of his career that toy with ideas of humanity gone fantastically, scientifically awry.

It lasted only four years; Wells left her for one of his students, Amy Catherine Robbins (Jane) whom he married in 1895 and had two sons with: George Philip (1901-1985) and Frank Richard (b.1903).

Wells had liaisons with a number of other women, who became models for his characters, while married to Jane: writer Amber Reeves gave birth to their daughter Anna Jane in 1909 and in 1914 author and feminist Rebecca West gave birth to their son Anthony West.

The Wells were quite poor and it was not the happiest of marriages; they would soon live apart though neither re-married.

At an early age Herbert was an avid reader but it would be some years before his talents as a writer were realised.

The experience provided much fodder for his future works including Kipps (1905) wherein orphan and draper's apprentice Artie Kipps gains a large inheritance and quick education on the ways of upper-class society.

The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll (1896) followed; Thus even in a shop assistant does the warmth of manhood assert itself....against the counsels of prudence and the restrictions of his means, to seek the wholesome delights of exertion and danger and pain.—Ch. When Wells won a scholarship in 1883 to the Normal School of Science in London he realised another area of interest that would serve him well in his writing; he began studies in biology and Darwinism under Thomas Henry Huxley, Aldous Huxley's grandfather.

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