Pulphead Essays Summary

Pulphead Essays Summary-8
"Feet in Smoke" goes for straightforward horror: "On the morning of April 21, 1995, my elder brother, Worth (short for Ellsworth), put his mouth to a microphone in a garage in Lexington, Kentucky, and in the strict sense of having been 'shocked to death,' was electrocuted."In "Pulphead," Sullivan regularly inserts himself as a character in the essays.This is surely true to a greater degree than in the original magazine pieces, which have been substantially rewritten for the book.

"Feet in Smoke" goes for straightforward horror: "On the morning of April 21, 1995, my elder brother, Worth (short for Ellsworth), put his mouth to a microphone in a garage in Lexington, Kentucky, and in the strict sense of having been 'shocked to death,' was electrocuted."In "Pulphead," Sullivan regularly inserts himself as a character in the essays.This is surely true to a greater degree than in the original magazine pieces, which have been substantially rewritten for the book.

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As he approached the festival, waiting in a line of cars, he watched a woman lean out of an orange Datsun.

She “blew a long, clear note on a ram’s horn.” (MORE: Read Lev Grossman on the new Charles Dickens biography) Three things I want to say about that.

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In "The Final Comeback of Axl Rose," it's when he connects the Guns N' Roses frontman's flight from the stultifying culture of Indiana to his own.

In "Getting Down to What Is Really Real" it's when he realizes MTV's "The Real World" has a psychologist that manipulates the cast members to pump up the drama.Sullivan has been writing some of the exciting magazine journalism of the last decade, mostly for GQ and also The Paris Review, Harper's and The Oxford American.He's won two National Magazine Awards, one for an article on which his first book, "Blood Horses: Notes of a Sportswriter's Son," was based, and the other, included in "Pulphead," for "Mr.His sentences are clean, his dialogue is sharp and his leads usually are excellent." I don't know, but I'd like to find out.It’s also not published with anything like the gravitas JJS has earned. Though DFW might be a better comparison, actually, except that JJS isn’t quite as clever as DFW (who is?The title is too faux-cool (as is the flap copy—in my experience anything billed as “mind-bending” won’t actually bend your mind). ), and on the plus side, he never makes the mistake of taking himself too seriously. Maybe that’s the key to JJS: he’s a man who happens to have been born in trivial times, and he meets a lot of trivial people, but he treats it all so very, very seriously.One, it’s incredible that some lady played a ram’s horn right in front of JJS as he arrived at Creation, but what makes that detail work, and what makes this an essay — and not, say, a tweet — is the orange Datsun; most writers, in their eagerness to get to the horn, would have skipped the Datsun. And — and I’m sorry to go on and on — twenty-three pages into this essay, which is a blisteringly fast 40-page read, JJS finds a new gear and pulls the rug out from under us with a personal revelation that throws everything that came before, and that comes after, into a completely new light.Two, rather than simply stunning us with this detail, JJS has the characteristic grace to tell us that he, too, was stunned by the horn. Third thing: you can absorb all of the above, RV included, in a single two-page spread of (pp 8-9). (JJS would never mix three metaphors like that in one sentence, but you get what I mean.) There are other writers (not many) who are as funny as JJS, and others (even fewer) as smart, but those writers tend to use humor and smarts as defenses.There's a chapter called "Unnamed Caves" in which Sullivan goes into the newly discovered caves of the Cumberland Plateau to see some of the art preserved there.It's a deep obsession of his, one worthy of another book.

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